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What is Neuropathy?

What is peripheral neuropathy?

What is peripheral neuropathy?

Doctors divide the nervous system into two parts: the central nervous system, which is the brain and the spinal cord, and the peripheral nervous system which is the nerves coming from the brain and the spinal cord to the rest of the body (the hands, the feet, the trunk, etc.). When there's a problem with the nerves in the peripheral nervous system—when they are damaged or diseased—it’s called a peripheral neuropathy. Often, it's just referred to as neuropathy.

Examples of a peripheral neuropathy are the polyneuropathy of diabetes where your feet become numb, tingling, burning, and shooting pains in a manner from the toes that ascends up into the feet and legs over time. A tarsel tunnel syndrome or carpal tunnel syndrome, radiculopathy such as sciatica (compression on the nerve)—these are all examples of peripheral neuropathy.

What are the causes of neuropathy?

What are the causes of neuropathy?

There are over 100 causes of neuropathy. The most common cause of neuropathy is diabetes. Alcoholism can cause neuropathy, reactions to certain medications can cause neuropathy. The best example being chemo-therapeutically induced neuropathy, which occurs after certain cancer treatments. Infections can cause neuropathy. Neuropathy can be inherited; the most common example of that is charcot-marie-tooth disease. Tumors can cause neuropathy when they put compression onto a nerve. Vitamin deficiencies can cause neuropathy. There are many other possible causes of neuropathy; this is a partial list.

What treatments are available for neuropathy?

What treatments are available for neuropathy?

The treatment of a neuropathy depends on the cause of the neuropathy. Many times with diabetic, alcoholic, or chemo-therapeutically induced neuropathy, a specialized form of vitamin B1 (a safe nutrient) is used and is often helpful and successful. Physical therapy can be used in treatment of neuropathy. Certainly, diabetics should have their blood sugar well-controlled. If there's a compression on the nerve, the compression should be released. Surgery is sometimes indicated for the treatment of neuropathy. If there's a vitamin deficiency, a vitamin can be given to reverse the deficiency and the subsequent peripheral neuropathy. Diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus, etc. should undergo treatment and hopefully the neuropathy will decrease in severity with treatment of the primary and causative disease.

How does Dr. Mann treat neuropathy in his office?

How does Dr. Mann handle neuropathy in his office?

After making a diagnosis and hopefully finding a cause for the neuropathy, Dr. Mann uses many techniques in his office for treatment of neuropathy. He often starts with nutritional treatment of neuropathy, many times reversing vitamin B1 deficiency with a specialized nutrient designed to rapidly reverse this deficiency. It is highly successful. In fact, Dr. Mann has developed a technique using nutrition which is incorporated currently in well over a thousand offices.

Additionally, other medications can be used. If the neuropathy is intractable to all treatment, many times physical therapy or decompression of compressed nerves can be done.

Types of Neuropathy

What is diabetic neuropathy?

What is diabetic neuropathy?

Diabetic neuropathy, more precisely called diabetic polyneuropathy, is when the nerves of the feet and legs start to dysfunction or work improperly. Generally, it starts in the big toe and goes up the feet in legs in the same manner in which you put on stockings, but the progression takes years usually. The symptoms include numbness, tingling, burning, and shooting pains. Diabetic polyneuropathy is the most common type of neuropathy.

With diabetic neuropathy, it’s always a good idea to control your blood sugar as best you can; to never walk barefooted because you don't want to step on anything you can't feel, and that might result in an ulceration or a wound that you didn't know you have because you have numbness in your feet; or we shake out your shoes to make sure there's nothing in your shoes. And be careful where you walk. Don't walk barefoot, make sure your shoes fit well and that your socks fit well.

Doctors often treat diabetic neuropathy with anticonvulsant or antidepressants, but recently we’ve come to realize that nutritional treatment of diabetic neuropathy is very, very successful without the side effects associated with other medications. Often, nutritional treatment of neuropathy, when given properly, can result in some alleviation of symptoms within a month’s time.

What is alcholic neuropathy?

What is alcoholic neuropathy?

Alcoholic neuropathy is a burning, tingling, numbness, and shooting pain that occurs in the feet and legs as a result of excessive use of alcohol over an extended period of time.

It used to be thought that this was primarily due to poor nutrition, but now scientists believe it's because of a vitamin B1 deficiency. Vitamin B1 is absorbed from the intestines, and alcohol is toxic to the intestines and prevents the absorption of vitamin B1 under normal circumstances. In order to combat this, many people get relief by using a specialized form of vitamin B1 that’s absorbed more appropriately.

What is chemo-therapeutically induced neuropathy?

What is chemo-therapeutically induced neuropathy?

Chemotherapy is often given to people with cancer as a treatment. The toxic effects of the chemotherapy can affect the nerves of the lower extremity of the feet and legs, causing burning, tingling, numbness, and shooting pains. The doctor has to weigh the risk versus benefit when giving chemotherapy to a patient. In order to try and kill the cancer, sometimes the nerves are destroyed. Many times, chemo-therapeutically induced peripheral neuropathy can be helped with the proper nutrition.

What is idiopathic neuropathy?

What is idiopathic neuropathy?

Idiopathic means we don't know the reason for it or it comes in and of itself. People with idiopathic neuropathy have burning, tingling, numbness, and shooting pains in their feet and legs with no apparent underlying cause.

It's very common in older people, as though it was a natural process of aging of the peripheral nervous system. Sometimes it’s a result of some hidden disease that after the neuropathy it becomes apparent, the disease is diagnosed afterwards. Most commonly though, it's a result of aging. It often responds to nutrients when the nutrients are given properly.